Pods £20, each, last two-three days, needed for rest of life
Monitor £250
Education and training, and support - Free
Our NHS... priceless...

*****

A lot of you will know that my son has autism, I post about it enough, and some of you might know that I deal with depression and anxiety (something a lot of authors do - I blame the perfect worlds we build in our heads!). I posted that my dad had heart disease, and that cancer has touched our family on more than one occasion.

But, I'm not sure I've posted about diabetes before, maybe I have, but it's something that is very close and personal in my life. My husband has been a type 1 diabetic since he was a teenager. He injects seven or more times a day, tests his sugar levels just as much. He deals with hypos (when his blood sugar goes so low that his brain just shuts down), hypers (when his blood sugars are high and he is lethargic and exhausted). He has sleep issues, some small problems with his eyes, and the threat always of horrible things like circulation issues, amputation, kidney issues, blindness.

Diabetes isn't just fucking hard work, it's a life sentence that sometimes can get to be way too much for a person to handle, not to mention the family around them.

Now, hubby is well, he keeps his sugars at good levels, and follows a low carb diet that has seen dramatic improvements on his long term sugar levels, basically, he's keeping well. He's also tall, skinny, and extremely fit.

But, diabetes really is a bastard of a thing. It controls his life and he's had it so long he doesn't know any difference now.

Anyway, for the longest time he's been waiting to go on a pump, which is kind of this pod thing that sits and dispenses insulin (pod thing = technical term!). We don't know fully how it will all work but it's exciting to see. He's one of these annoying people who reads all the instruction manuals, and is equally the best patient they will ever have, as he will follow every instruction to the letter.

Today, the pump pod things arrived !!!!! and much excitement has hit the Scott household.

Here's hoping it goes really well... fingers crossed...


7 comments:

  1. Good luck with the pod things, I hope it will make life easier for your husband. Chronic disease is indeed a life long pain in the proverbial. Not impossible to live with but definitely frustrating and at times exhausting. Your husband may be a hero, in my experience the partners of those who deal with Chronic Illness are at least as heroic as the sufferer themselves (and yes, I do speak from personal experience). Circulation issues are truly terrifying. I know, I'm came 'this' close to losing my lower right leg. But, as long as the two of you and the rest of your combined loved ones stick together and combine your heroic efforts, you'll be fine. Trust me <3

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  2. Good luck - a friend has one of these and is so pleased with it. My granddad had diabetes and was always so organised with his injections etc. I hope it goes well.

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  3. I really hope the pump helps and makes life that bit easier for your man. I know a few type 1 diabetics and some have a pump. Certainly seems to make life simpler after the initial settling in period.

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  4. Might just find that's it the best thing since sliced bread. Here's hoping. Love you all. Hugs. Vx

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  5. I understand exactly what he is going through. My mum, sister, nephew, sister-in-law and mother-in-law are all type 2 diabetics. All of them are on insulin pens. I really hope that this pump works and makes life easier for Rj's Hubby. Hugs to you both.

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  6. Wishing RJ's Hubby all the best. My friend has a pump that he loves. Hope you get great results. <3

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  7. So glad to hear RJ's hubby is taking care of himself. As an RN I've dealt with insulin pumps and for people who are diligent they're great. Good luck RJ's hubby. 😀

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